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20121130
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spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any
hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could al bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers still
from super storm sandy, a nor'easter is pummeling the region tonight, bringing with it powerful rains, wind and sleet. already today, 22,000 homes and businesses have lost power between the carolinas and new york. that's on top of the 650,000 people still without power from sandy last week. today's storm has also forced the cancellation of nearly 1,500 flights in the northeast, with newark airport in new jersey facing the most cancellations. >> susie: boeing showed today how it's preparing for the so- called "fiscal cliff": it's restructuring its defense business, big time. as the pentagon's largest supplier, boeing said it is slashing management jobs by 30%, consolidating business units and closing some defense facilities in california. boeing hopes to cut costs by more than $1.5 billion over the next two years. >> susie: boeing shares got caught up in the market downdraft, tom, falling 2%, and it had plenty of company. all 30 of the dow components were in the red today. >> there was a lot of red on the screen this post-election day. in europe, and also earnings, all getting mixed in
can find more and the reach out and read program lost thousands of books after hurricane sandy last month. >> brown: finally tonight, the college football season is reaching a climax of rivalries and conference championship games and its basketball season is now underway. but much of the action in college sports these days is away from the field or the court, as schools change affiliations and leagues. in the last 18 months some 30 colleges have made moves. among the most prominent, the university of louisville's departure from the big east to join the atlantic coast conference or a.c.c. and two eastern schools headed to the big ten, traditionally a midwest-based conference: the university of maryland is leaving the a.c.c. and rutgers is departing from the big east. what's going on? sportswriter and author john feinstein joins me now. john, first of all, for the uninitiated, explain the role of these conferences traditionally. how do they work and how do they divide up the college world? >> well, jeff, conferences were designed initially to take schools that were together geographic
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4